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Curriculum vitae

Franco Bagnoli

16/6/1961: Born in Florence (Italy).

Titles:
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30/7/1980: General Certificate of Education in science (maturità scientifica). Mark 60/60.
13/7/1989: Master degree (Laurea) in Physics of the University of Flo-
rence Mark 110/110 with honors. Director of thesis: Prof. S. Ruffo.
Title: Aspetti teorici legati alla simulazione di modelli fisici tramite automi cellulari (Theoretical aspects related to the simulation of physical models by means of cellular automata).
19/5/1994: Diplôme d'Étude Approfondi (DEA) of the University Pierre
et Marie Curie (Paris 6).
16/6/1997: PhD in Theoretical Physics of the University Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6). Director: Nino Boccara. Mark Très Honorable. Title of thesis: Etude de quelques modèles discrets en physique et biologie 15/9/1997 Equivalence with the Italian doctorate by Ministero della Università e Ricerca Scientifica.

Research topics
===========

I have always been involved in discrete models (cellular automata, coupled maps), both from the point of view of statistical mechanics and dynamic systems, applying them to the study of physical, chemical and biological systems. Cellular automata are dynamic systems defined on lattice, in which both time and dynamic variables are discrete. The ultimate goal of this type of modeling approach is to describe complex behavior from very simple elements that evolve based on local interactions that can be implemented exactly on an electronic computer.
The research concerning discrete models can be divided into two parts: the one that deals with their mathematical properties and the one that uses them as a tool to build models of physical or biological systems.

Study of the mathematical properties of cellular automata
-----------------

During the preparation of my thesis I collaborated in the construction of an electronic computer dedicated to the simulation of cellular automata. I then applied the simulation techniques that I was developing to the study of a theoretical model (Game of Life). The technique used was then refined, and starting from its generalization I developed a formalism for the extension to the discrete functions of Taylor series development that has applications in the minimization of the Boolean functions used in the simulations of physical systems and in the design of integrated circuits . This formalism then allowed to extend the concept of chaoticity to discrete systems and to develop the problem of replication symmetry breaking in out-of-equilibrium systems on a theoretical basis.

In the field of theoretical physics I have also dealt with phase transitions in out-of-equilibrium systems. In particular, I dealt with cross-over induced by diffusion, the study of critical properties using the phenomenological renormalization group and the coexistence of different universality classes. I have also worked on the correspondence between critical systems and self-critical systems.

A related topic concerns the study of lattice gas, a theoretical research field with practical applications to hydraulic design. These systems are efficiently simulated but have unusual thermodynamic properties. In particular, I am interested in the relationship between entropy and chaotic properties (Lyapunov exponents).

Synchronization
----------------

The phenomenon to be studied here is to explain if and when two chaotic dynamical systems can synchronize, ie the two trajectories can converge, in the presence of an external stimulus (generally noise). Chaotic systems have the property of being sensitive to the initial condition. The original definition of chaoticity (based on the Lyapunov exponents) does not distinguish between divergence in site variables and spatial divergence. Using a new technique, which consists
in forcing two replicas of the same system to synchronize, one can define an indicator of chaoticity that takes into account the spatial structure of the system. I'm working on synchronization in chaotic systems and cellular automata, in connection with
the phenomenon of unpredictable behaviors of non-chaotic systems. This technique promises to be particularly interesting for the extraction of unobservable parameters in a real experiment, using a synchronized replica on a computer.

Control of discrete systems
-----------------

Lately I started to apply the concepts of chaos and synchronization to the control of discrete systems, in particular cellular automata. This is a highly non-linear case of regional control, in which one tries to drive a region of a system towards a certain state or a particular trajectory.

Modeling of physical systems
-----------------

I collaborated with S. Ciliberto on the realization of a convection experiment of Raileigh-Bènard on a ring-shaped cell. Later I collaborated on the interpretation of experimental data using a probabilistic model with cellular automata. I applied the concept of cellular automaton to the study of fast ionic conduction and to the poisoning of catalysts. I have developed a simplified model for the transport of sediments (sand) in a river. I also worked on the development of hydrodynamic models based on Boltzmann equation latex.


Evolutionary dynamics of populations
-----------------

I am interested in the study of evolutionary models of population in the presence of competition, with particular attention to the phenomenon of species formation, using both numerical techniques and methods of statistical mechanics. The conceptual starting point is the following: the competition for a resource generally depends on a phenotypic trait (for example: seeds of a certain size can be used more successfully by birds with a beak of appropriate size, which then compete for this resource). The phenotypic trait depends, as a first approximation, on a set of genes, which interact in a non-epistatic way (ie the effects of which add up). Competition then induces repulsive interaction in the genotypic space, an interaction that may be sufficient to cause speciation even in a flat adaptive landscape. I am also interested in the topological and metric structure of the genotypic space, and on the evolutionary consequences of the "small world" phenomenon. The small world effect can be condensed by saying that even a small probability of performing "jumps" over long distances profoundly changes a diffusive dynamic. In the case of evolution the presence of such an effect can change the interpretative paradigm of evolution: instead of being dominated by the time necessary to "discover" a new niche, one would have that all the existing niches are discovered and populated in a short time. , while evolutionary changes are given by the coevolution of all species in interaction, which causes the "creation" of new ecological niches.

Sociological, psychological and cognitive models
----------------
In the last few years I have been involved in studying models
of opinions, in particular by applying concepts derived from the ecology of populations and individual models that can also serve as datamining tools in other fields. In an evolutionary perspective, a process similar to that for gene evolution can be postulated: cerebral functions evolve substantially through duplication and differentiation. This allows us to hypothesize a certain "universality" in the functions, and therefore to use schemes deriving from the cognitive sciences also for the higher functions. Finally, given that human selection occurs essentially through sexual selection, it must be remembered that many traits may have been selected independently of their specific function.
A connection between genetics, population dynamics and sociology is found in the study of the influence of the perception of the risk of infection in the dynamics of an epidemic.
Lately I am also interested in the experimental investigation of the cognitive dynamics of small groups, especially when they are in virtual interaction.

Jobs
==========
1986-1990: Sofware consultant c/o Soluzioni EDP srl.
4/2/1991-31/10/2001: Technical position in the Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Florence, Via S. Marta, 3 I-50139 Firenze, Italy.
1/11/2001-31/12/2012: Researcher in the Department of Energy, University of Florence, Via S. Marta, 3 I-50139 Firenze, Italy.
since 1/1/2013: Researcher in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze, Italy.

Teaching
============
2002/2003: Physics 2 (thermodynamics, 3 credits), Environmental Engineering (first level, three years).
2003/2004: Physics 1 (mechanics, 4 credits) and Physics 2 (thermodynamics, 3 credits) Environmental Engineering and Statistical Physics (5 credits), Environmental Engineering (second level, two years) and PhD in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2004/2005: Mechanics and Thermodynamics (7 credits), Environmental Engineering and Statistical Physics (5 credits), Environmental Engineering (second level, two years) and PhD in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2005/2006: General Physics 1 (mechanics and thermodynamics, 6 credits), Environmental Engineering and Statistical Physics (5 credits), Environmental Engineering (second level, two years) and PhD in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2007/2008: General Physics 2 (electromagnetism, 6 credits), Environmental Engineering and Statistical Physics (5 credits), Environmental Engineering (second level, two years) and PhD in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2008/2009: Statistical Physics (5 credits), Environmental Engineering (second level, two years) and doctorate in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2009/2010: Statistical Physics and Information Theory (6 credits), Information Engineering (second level, two years) and PhD in Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems.
2010-2011: Statistical Physics and Information Theory} (6 credits), Master's Degree in Computer Engineering of the University of Florence and the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and Physics of Complex Systems, Master's Degree in Science Physics and astronomy
2011-2012: Statistical Physics and Information Theory} (6 credits), Master's Degree in Computer Engineering of the University of Florence and the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems
2012-2013: TStatistical Physics and Information Theory} (6 credits), Master's Degree in Computer Engineering of the University of Florence and of the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and of the course of General Physics 1 (6 credits ) for Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering
2013-2014: Statistical Physics and Information Theory} (6 credits), Master's Degree in Computer Engineering of the University of Florence and the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems
2014-2014: Statistical Physics and Information Theory} (3 credits), and Computational Physics Laboratory (6 credits) Master's Degree in Physical and Astronomical Sciences of the University of Florence and the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Systems Complexes and the PhD in Physics
2015-2016: Physics of Complex Systems and Information Theory} (3 credits), and Laboratory of Computational Physics (6 credits) Master's Degree in Physical and Astronomical Sciences of the University of Florence and of the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and the PhD in Physics
2016-2017: Physics of Complex Systems and Information Theory} (3 credits), and Computational Physics Laboratory (6 credits) Master's Degree in Physical and Astronomical Sciences of the University of Florence and Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and the PhD in Physics
2017-2018: Computational Physics Laboratory course (6 credits) Master's Degree in Physical and Astronomical Sciences of the University of Florence and of the Ph.D. in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and of the Ph.D. in Physics

2015-2018 Scientific Communication Laboratory course for PhD in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and PhD in Physics

2016-2018 Introduction to Modeling with Agents with NetLogo for PhD in Nonlinear Physics and Complex Systems and PhD in Physics

Research coordination tasks
=================

2005-2013: Local coordinator (FIRENZE) of the INFN TO61 experiment (Physics and Biology).
2013-2015: National Coordinator of the INFN PIECES experiment (Physics of Complex Systems).
2015-2018: National Coordinator of the INFN PlexNet experiment (Physics of Complex Systems)

Coordination of the Bachelor's and Master's thesis work
----------------------

1994: Unofficial supervisor in the master thesis in Physics (Florence) by Giovanna Guasti (Rapporteur Stefano Ruffo) entitled "dynamics of Ising models and protein synthesis in bacteria".
1995: Supervisor of the master thesis in Biology (Florence) by Mauro Romanelli (supervisor Marcello Buiatti) entitled "two models with discrete variables of mitotic dynamics in cell populations".
1996: Supervisor of the master thesis in Physics (Florence) by Paolo Palmerini entitled "numerical and analytical methods for the study of the critical properties of probabilistic discrete systems".
2000: Supervisor of the master thesis in Biology (Florence) by Carlo Guardiani entitled A theoretical model of quasi-species evolution.
2003: Supervisor of the master thesis in Environmental Engineering (Florence) by Luca Sguanci entitled "Interaction between liquid and granular medium: study of applicability of the Boltzmann lattice method".
2004: Supervisor (with G. Manfrida, A. Barbaro and F. Giovannini) of the master thesis in Engineering for the Environment and Territory of Valentina Lapolla entitled "Analysis, application, evaluation and comparison of diffusion models in complex terrain: a case study in Sambuca, Tavarnelle VP (FI) ".
2007: Supervisor (with E. Vicario, and F. Poli) of the master thesis in Engineering for the Environment and Territory of Pistolesi Alessio entitled "Design and development of a web application for teaching support based on middleware for persistence ".
2008: Supervisor of the master thesis in Engineering for the protection of the environment and of the territory of Giulio Mariotti entitled "MODEL HYDROMORPHODYNAMIC LATEX BOLTZMANN FINALIZED IN THE STUDY OF LOCALIZED EROSIVE PHENOMENA"
2010: Supervisor of the bachelor degree thesis in Physics of Filippo Miele entitled "The problem of inverse Ising in the theory of Evolution"
2015: Supervisor of the master thesis in Computer Engineering by Sandro Mehic entitled "Information role and topography in competitive systems based on agents and with limited resources"
2015: Supervisor of the master thesis in Physical Sciences and Astrophysics of Giulia Cencetti entitled "Random walk on the net: competition between traps"
2017: Supervisor of the master thesis in Physical and Astrophysical Sciences by Gianmario Marrelli entitled "Characterization of a model of Mercedes-Benz water on the hexagonal reticulum"


Doctoral thesis
-----------------

1998: Unofficial supervisor of the PhD thesis in Physics (Florence) by Lucia Baroni (supervisor Roberto Livi) entitled "noise, chaos and synchronization in dynamic systems with many degrees of freedom" (chapter 4: "stochastic synchronization in spatially extended systems ").
1999: Unofficial Tutor in the PhD thesis in Physics (Bologna) by Michele Bezzi (supervisor Roberto Livi) entitled "Modeling biology by cellular automata" (chapter 2: "A cellular automata model for a simple ecosystem").
2004: Tutor (with Stefano Ruffo) of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Fabio Franci, entitled "Models of social phenomena".
2006: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Computer Engineering) by Luca Sguanci entitled "Modeling Infective Diseases: from viral coevolution to risk perception in epidemics".
2009: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Andrea Guazzini entitled "Computational models of cognitive activity: from neural to social dynamics"
2010: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Pietro Lió entitled "Computational models in fighting diseases"
2014: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Alisa Santarlasci entitled "Modeling ant warfare: a" chemical "approach".
2014: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Emanuele Massaro entitled "Local Dynamics in Complex Networks: from community detection to epidemic spreading".
2014: Tutor of the PhD thesis in Non-linear Dynamics and Complex Systems (Florence) by Alessandro Cini entitled "Small group dynamics: interweaving sociophysics and experimental psychology".
2018: Tutor (with A. Zaldei, S. Di Lonardo, G. Gualtieri) of the doctoral thesis in Information Engineering (Florence) of Alice Cavaliere entitled "Anthropic sensors and control networks for territory and smart cities".

Other research activities
============

Referee for Physical Review E, Physical Review Letters, Physica A, International Journal of Modern Physics C, Journal of Theoretical Biology, Journal of Computational Physics, Physics Letters A, J. Phys. A, European Journal of Physics B, Chaos, Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulations, Chaos, Information Sciences.

Other
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President of the association "CaffeScienza" (Scientific Café) (organization of scientific discussions) http://www.caffescienza.it

Known languages.
===========
Italian, English, French and Spanish

For publications, see https://www.unifi.it/p-doc2-2013-200006-B-3f2a3d2c362f2c-0.html

Orcid site: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6293-0305


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